Apps

US Android users download more apps but spend less, report says

 Google Play, the app service for Android users, is not the same moneymaker for app makers as its Apple App Store counterpart.
android-go-google-play-store
Android users are downloading more apps from Google Play, but less inclined to spend.

Juan Garzón / CNET

Market researcher Sensor Tower released a report Thursday that shows on average Android users in the US are spending 33 percent less on Google Play than iPhone users are on the App Store. On the other hand, Android users download more apps per device, an average of 42 from Google Play last year, while last year iPhone users downloaded an average of 33 per device from the App Store.

Do Android users have tighter pockets? Sensor Tower researcher Ruika Lin wrote that Android devices are “typically lower-priced that Apple’s,” which suggests that Android users could be more “cost-conscious.”

Android users are clearly into their games: The category accounted for a whopping 90 percent of their total average expenditure, and the mobile games category is reported as best performer for both Google Play and the App Store. While Android users put their money into purchasing twice as many games as iPhone users, iPhone users are still keeping up, with Android and iPhone users both spending $27 on games last year.

Other categories for Android pale in comparison, with users paying less than $0.50 on apps, and average download numbers don’t go past a handful. These findings came from an estimated 135 million active Android devices in the US that come with default access to Google’s Play store.

Despite results from last year, in a statement to CNET, Lin believes that Android users will begin burning more cash this year.

She said that, as the market develops, people download less apps but spend more money on the ones they do install on their device. “It wouldn’t be surprising if we find that the per-device spending increases and downloads decrease [for Android users next year],” she noted.

Google declined to comment on the findings.

[Source”cnbc”]